For it's not light that is needed, but fire; it's not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind and the earthquake in our hearts.

Frederick Douglass

American Social Reformer, Abolitionist

To leave a comment, please sign in with
or or

Comments (13)

  1. Munkyman

    A more poetic phrasing of Jefferson’s own sentiments on revolution being a continuing need in a Republic. The thing I like best about Mr. Douglass was his position of, I don’t need & I don’t want your handouts, I just want an equal shot to show my value… get out of the way.

    September 12, 2016
    1. Munkyman

      https://youtu.be/wjZeUifVI-I
      It should be noted once a freeman Douglass spent a bit of time in Ireland & Scotland, discussing the politics of oppression with those who knew it well.

      September 12, 2016
      1. drivefaastakechances

        I never heard a version of that quite like that. You are always good for this type of thing. Always. Consistent. I appreciate that. Thank you.

        September 15, 2016
        1. Munkyman

          September 15, 2016
    2. drivefaastakechances

      I am slowly getting to know him while I was getting to know and understand Susan B. I had forgotten your innate comprehension of Jefferson until just this moment reading your comment. I do not think of myself as a violent person. Our culture of rape, disrespect of women by women and men, disregard of human life with mental and emotional abuse is still very rampant in this country. We can make a cultural change—even one person at a time through both kindness and firm storm—I believe. My parents taught me well, it’s time for change and understanding. It’s time for re-education and rebalance. I agree with what you love about Douglass. He just kept writing and reiterating—traveling, writing and reiterating. Thank you for your wonderful mind, Munk. Thanks for meeting here on this post. I am amazed at how misunderstood and amiss Douglass still is to this day. Desperate times do call for desperate measures. The abused need a voice and chance to rise up and break free. What happened to our culture. What happened to parents raising decent, respectful, as well as polite children. This is where we dropped the ball in America. How is being judgemental a strength in character. How have we confused critical thinking with criticizing and massacruing a persons person health and life a way of moving forward. How is HIPPA and privacy out the door for people in the lime light how have humans lost their rights to so many many things in our “constitution” but choosing to have a voice in the first place.

      September 15, 2016
      1. Munkyman

        I wish I had answers, I just have a lot of the same questions & more. The best answer I have is when a society gets rich it begins to quit paying attention to the things that matter in favor of things that are shiny.

        September 15, 2016
        1. drivefaastakechances

          I agree with you. I am willing to negotiate and befriend individuals who lose sight of things that matter. And people who are retired who have grown tired. I am sitting on tenor front porch and asking questions and getting answers from this well experienced souls. Gathering their wisdom and I will utilize my renewed energy to get their voices a heard again. I am craving and dying to spend time with people who use their brains and hearts equally. And I think I have found such souls, just recently. Thank you Munk.

          September 19, 2016
          1. Munkyman

            That’s a treasure to be sure. Congratulations.

            September 19, 2016
      2. Munkyman

        I think a lot of the problem with being judgmental comes from this idea that we’re perfect just the way we are which means it must be someone else’s fault & then we get to be judgmental because someone else is our problem, we certainly aren’t, we’re perfect just the way we are. We don’t have to grow & accept others, they have to tolerate us & they better accept us or we’ll scream bloody murder about fair… unless you expect us to treat you fairly. After all we’re perfect, if you think we’re not fair that’s your problem. I’m a fan of an education in logic that begins near the age of 7 & continues until college.

        September 19, 2016
        1. drivefaastakechances

          I like your reply. But how do you teach logic and common sense. It’s been my experience that innately book smart, highly intelligent people and people who believe they are smarter than others tend to miss the common sense and logic boat. I was fortunate to have parents who were both very right brained and very common sense, logical acting people with heart and decency. I am crave people like that and I won’t stop until I keep finding them. I sometimes think when I read Mr Douglass’ words and Ms Anthony’s speeches that the world really hasn’t heard them, only a select few and most of them are dead. As you know I live in her area and it’s amazing to me how many books are not available to adults, they are plenty for children but we both know those are just quick icons of what history has passed down, no one knows and comprehends the true affects her getting arrested in her own home for voting had on the world around her and her rationale for moving forward on women’s rights more than as an abolishionist. Even I don’t fully comprehend what Douglass did for people of color being abused, I do know that with this quote alone he knew what had to be down to rise past dispicable behaviors and treatments of human beings. His pure and unadulterated perseverance changed everything during and after his time, like Ms Anthony’s. I like your answer because it speaks of judgement, ignorance, personally self-serving and never for woman- and man- kind. Thank you for engaging.

          September 20, 2016
          1. Munkyman

            You teach logic the same way the Greeks did, the adversarial method. What Douglass understood that many people of color don’t is that it wasn’t unique, their suffering isn’t different or even deeper. Douglass got free went to Boston & quickly went to Ireland to learn from those who had suffered much longer. People who are still dominated in their own land today.

            September 20, 2016
            1. drivefaastakechances

              It is that exactly. People (a life) who have been oppressed, abused, held down, beaten, ridiculed openly or not openly. Anywhere intolerance has been taught and became a driving force. I strongly feel Douglass goes unrecognized for his brilliance. And that is what disturbs me most. My point to posting this is just that, we are in need again to overcome with something overwhelming, again. We need a revival. I am amazed by this man, especially given when, where he grew up into an adult.

              September 20, 2016
            2. Munkyman

              That’s because the history of when & where he grew up is much maligned. Many people felt that their slaves were family, lots of people taught their slaves to read & write… so many there needed to be a law against it. Once the skill was in the slave community it was quickly passed about to those able to learn quick & mostly on their own. Stonewall Jackson taught a slave at his Uncle’s Mill to read & write which helped him escape to the North & Canada. Stonewall Jackson also began the 1st black Sunday School in the Commonwealth of Virginia, he’s remembered in the all black church in Lexington to this day for it. The place & time of Douglass was complex, not black & white.

              September 20, 2016